Creationtide

This comes to my attention a little late for implementing this year, but something to consider for another year, perhaps:

“Creationtide is a concept introduced by the late Ecumenical Patriarch, Demetrios I, 1989.

Since then, September 1 (chosen because it is first day of the Orthodox ecclesiastical year) has been adopted as the start of Creationtide. This is the season, running to St Francis day on October 4, when churches and congregations are called to pay special attention to the responsibility of humanity for the Earth and for all that lives upon it. Its start and end dates reflect that it is a shared idea between Western and Eastern Christianity.

Churches Together in Britain and Ireland adopted the concept in 2008. In 2016, Pope Francis declared 1 September an annual World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creationtide.
While its adoption was in part driven by the complex environmental crises the human race faces, Creationtide draws on much deeper roots in Scripture and in older Christian traditions of the relationship between God, humanity and the created order.

The timing of Creationtide means it is an excellent way of rooting traditional harvest festivals in wider issues and firm theological ground.” CofE Comms.

The worship resources commended by CofE Comms include:

The World Wide Council of Churches’ list of resources is here.

There’s also this from the Diocese of Bristol on how to worship with nature and a psalm setting and some other useful notes from Quodcumque (see the Notes on unaccompanied singing among the links).

Textweek provides the following 3 year cycle of resources for Creationtide:

Season of Creation:
Year A: Creation 1A Forest
Creation 2A Land
Creation 3A Outback/Wilderness
Creation 4A River
Year B: Creation 1B Earth
Creation 2B Humanity
Creation 3B Sky
Creation 4B Mountain
Year C: Creation 1C Ocean
Creation 2C Fauna
Creation 3C Storm
Creation 4C Cosmos

And it’s worth checking out the CofE blogs on environmental issues.

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Author: @RoffenWorship

A Slightly Welsh Priest

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